Celebrity for a (Holi)day: Julia Child

Turn your holiday season kitchen time into a
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Introduce your kids to the woman who introduced Americans to homemade French cooking. Begin with a breakfast of French toast, quiche, or Julia’s French scrambled eggs and build your day around Julia’s recipe for living.

Be Fearless
An ageless female role model, Julia Child exemplifies strength, intelligence, and fearlessness. She successfully reinvented herself in midlife, finding her passion as a chef, cooking teacher, and author after a career in government intelligence.

For kids:

  • Role play in a chef costume set, or ask you child what other careers would make them feel fearless.
  • Talk about new and unusual foods, and why your child might automatically consider them “yucky.” Taste-test new flavors, you just might come up with some winners to expand their palate.
  • Encourage kids to try new things: new foods, new sports, new books, new friends, and new experiences.

Invent
Julia Child loved inventing her own recipes and putting her twist on classical French dishes. Especially at holiday time, get into the kitchen with your kids and encourage their creativity as you prepare treats for those you love.

For kids:

  • Stand back and see what happens! Give kids a little age-appropriate space and allow them to decorate their own cookies in their own way. These red-nosed reindeer cookies are a breeze to prepare, and these Snowman Cookies are a cinch. Don’t forget: beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Play
Julia exhibited a cheerful demeanor that came from loving life and living her passion every day. For Julia, cooking wasn’t work. It was play!

For kids:

Fail
According to Julia Child’s example, cooking, like life, is something we cannot completely control. Accepting life’s disasters, both in and out of the kitchen, is part of the journey.

For kids:

  • All children eventually learn that things don’t always work out. In the kitchen, on the playground, and, later, in the boardroom, failure represents an opportunity to own our mistakes.
  • Talk with your kids about making mistakes and learning from them. Julia Child, for example, drew attention to her mistakes on her television shows, explained what went wrong, and moved on. She could laugh at herself without putting herself down – the epitome of strength, intelligence, and grace.

Read and write
Julia authored 18 books and hosted 11 television shows. Her contributions to America’s culinary landscape are virtually unmatched.

For kids:

  • Read and prepare recipes from kids’ cookbooks that promote healthy eating and good nutrition.
  • Older kids can write their own cookbook featuring pictures and recipes of their favorite foods using the Storytelling Paper Pad and Jumbo Colored Pencils or Non-Roll Markers.
  • Teach kids the difference between home cooking and take-out in Giada De Laurentiis’s Recipe for Adventure series of children’s books.